Archive | May, 2020

TPA Request for Additional Single-Track – Royal Gorge Field Office

Sent via email to:

Recreation Planning Staff
Attn: Linda Skinner
Royal Gorge Field Office
Bureau of Land Management
3028 E. Main St.
Canyon City, CO 81212

Request for additional multiple-use, motorized single-track recreational opportunities within the Royal Gorge Field Office’s areas of responsibility

Dear Linda:

Please accept this letter on behalf of the Trails Preservation Alliance (TPA) requesting consideration by the Bureau of Land Management’s, Royal Gorge Field Office (RGFO) for additional recreational opportunities within the jurisdictional boundaries of the RGFO, specifically for multiple use, motorized single-track trails.

The TPA is a volunteer organization created to be a viable partner to public land managers, working with the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to preserve the sport of trail riding and multi-use recreation. The TPA acts as an advocate for recreational trail riding and takes action to ensure that the USFS and BLM allocate a fair and equitable percentage of public lands access to diverse trail multi-use recreational opportunities.

Albeit this letter has been unsolicited by the RGFO, the TPA would like to offer our suggestion for enhanced recreational opportunities available for motorized single-track riding opportunities in OHV recreational spaces such as the Seep Springs, Penrose Commons, Big Bend OHV Park and Texas Creek areas.

The TPA is offering these comments because we believe it is fundamental and important to highlight and emphasize that multiple-use, motorized single-track is a very unique and special recreational experience just like a “downhill mountain bike trail”. That riding motorized single-track is no different than the cherished single-track trail riding experience that is embraced by the mountain bike community. It is well documented through multiple local sources, maps and guides (e.g., BLM’s Colorado Recreation Guide 2017, Backyard to Backcountry,) that the trail network and associated recreational spectrum of recreational infrastructure within the Colorado Front Range has very sparse multiple-use, motorized single-track riding opportunities on both USFS and BLM lands. Most conspicuously, there exists very few motorized single-track riding/trail opportunities designated for beginners or intermediate level riders looking for that very special recreational experience of “riding single-track”. As stated earlier, motorcyclists appreciate and cherish the single-track riding experience just like mountain bike and horseback riders do.

The TPA would offer our support for the RGFO’s consideration of any additional multiple-use, motorized single-track riding opportunities within the RGFO’s jurisdiction. The TPA is available to provide our technical expertise in planning, selecting and designing new multiple-use, motorized single-track trails and enhancing the recreational experiences of off-highway motorcyclists. The TPA is also willing to provide letters of support in the future should the RGFO decide to apply for CPW OHV grant funding to plan and or construct multiple use, motorized single-track trails. The TPA also has limited financial resources of our own that we could be willing to commit to the RGFO for the construction of new or additional multiple-use, motorized single-track trails.

In summary the TPA requests and supports the RGFO’s consideration of new and additional multiple-use, motorized single-track trails. Please feel free to contact myself, Don Riggle at 719-338-4106 or info@coloradotpa.org.

Sincerely,
D.E. Riggle
Director of Operations
Trails Preservation Alliance

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Letter of support for HR 5797 – The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Full Funding Act of 2020

Chairman Peter Defazio
2165 Rayburn Building
Washington, DC 20515

Ranking Member Sam Graves
2165 Rayburn Building
Washington, DC 20515

RE: Support for HR 5797 “The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Full Funding Act of 2020”

Dear Chairman Defazio and Ranking Member Graves:

Please accept this correspondence as the vigorous support of the Organizations above for HR 5797 “The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Full Funding Act of 2020” (“The Proposal”). Prior to addressing our support for the Proposal, we believe a brief summary of each Organization is needed. The Colorado Off-Highway Vehicle Coalition (“COHVCO”) is a grassroots advocacy organization of approximately 250,000 registered OHV users in Colorado seeking to represent, assist, educate, and empower all OHV recreationists in the protection and promotion of off-highway motorized recreation throughout Colorado. COHVCO is an environmental organization that advocates and promotes the responsible use and conservation of our public lands and natural resources to preserve their aesthetic and recreational qualities for future generations. The Trail Preservation Alliance (“TPA”) is a 100 percent volunteer organization whose intention is to be a viable partner, working with the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to preserve the sport of trail riding. The TPA acts as an advocate of the sport and takes the necessary action to ensure that the USFS and BLM allocate to trail riding a fair and equitable percentage of access to public lands. Colorado Snowmobile Association (“CSA”) was founded in 1970 to unite the more than 30,000 winter motorized recreationists across the state to enjoy their passion. CSA has also become the voice of organized snowmobiling seeking to advance, promote and preserve the sport of snowmobiling through work with Federal and state land management agencies and local, state and federal legislators telling the truth about our sport. The Idaho Recreation Council (“IRC”) is a recognized, statewide, collaboration of Idaho recreation enthusiasts and others that will identify and work together on recreation issues in cooperation with land managers, legislators and the public to ensure a positive future for responsible outdoor recreation access for everyone, now and into the future. For purposes of this correspondence TPA, COHVCO, CSA, and IRC will be referred to as “The Organizations”.

We are writing to request that HR 5797, “The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Full Funding Act of 2020” sponsored by Congressman Welch of VT and Congressman Curtis of UT be included in the transportation reauthorization bill currently being drafted in your committee. Without Congressional approval before September 30th, the program is at risk of going dormant, creating a huge void for recreational trail development and maintenance funding.

A. RTP funding is a catalyst for significant matching of funding from outside sources.

For more than a quarter-century the Recreational Trails Program (RTP) has been the key source of funding for recreational trails across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Based on the “user-pay, user-benefit” model of the Highway Trust Fund, the RTP is funded from gas taxes paid by nonhighway recreational vehicles. The RTP is currently funded at $84 million annually but it is estimated that federal gas taxes paid by nonhighway recreational vehicles amounts to more than $270 million annually. HR 5797 would correct this inequity and return more of the gas tax dollars for off-road recreation and be directing this funding to hugely successful programs that could direct this money immediately on to the ground for the benefit of all recreational uses. The Organizations are also intimately aware that often small amounts of RTP funding are major catalysts for matching efforts from partners on projects.

In Colorado, the Organizations are intimately familiar with the benefits of the RTP program as our RTP monies are pooled with the voluntary registration program funds from OHV registrations through Colorado Parks and Wildlife Trails Program. As you are aware, most states do not apply RTP monies in this way but rather administer the RTP program through their Department of Transportation. The Organizations note these programmatic differences not to assert one administration model is better than another but rather to allow you to understand why we are able to identify these benefits so clearly. The result of this programmatic leveraging inn Colorado is the approximately $1.5 million in funding currently provided through RTP becomes more than $6 million in funding on the ground. While this leveraging significantly magnifies the impacts of the RTP program, funding of multiple use recreational access still falls well short of the funding needs on the ground, as we are facing unprecedented challenges such as poor forest health, in many of the recreational areas throughout the western United States. The existing RTP funding is critical in providing basic maintenance of trails throughout the State of Colorado and fully funding the RTP program would allow these maintenance efforts to significantly expand almost immediately for all types of usages. It has been our experience that the RTP model of funding provides the most flexibility in use of these monies, while LWCF monies have more restrictions in their funding and sometimes remain unused as a result. The flexibility of the funding in the RTP program is a major reason we are asking for the program to be fully funded. This funding is the easiest and fastest money to be able to use and provides basic safety for all users of these recreational opportunities as maintained trails are safe trails.

In Idaho, similar leveraging of RTP funding without registration based funding occurs consistently as well as Idaho administers the RTP program in conjunction with their user registration program. We would like to highlight three projects where RTP money was leveraged with registration funds and projects were able to undertaken that are much larger in scale than could ever be undertaken with RTP money alone.

1. Bear Valley Lakes National Recreation Trail Heavy Maintenance

This project completed significant maintenance on the Bear Valley Lakes National Recreation Trail, a motorized single-track trail in the Salmon-Challis National Forest. Lemhi County, the project sponsor, was awarded an RTP grant of $27,920 with $9,405 in matching funds. The trail was cleared of trees and rocks, the trail tread was maintained, and areas with erosion and drainage issues were addressed to improve the riding experience and reduce stream sedimentation. The county, along with the Youth Employment Program, US Forest Service staff and volunteers from a local user group completed the project.

2. Beaver Creek Trail Reroute

This current project in the Sawtooth National Forest was awarded $43,000 in RTP funds with a match of $30,000. A major component of the project is re-opening the Beaver Creek Trail. This motorized single-track trail has been impacted by recent fires and flooding, and the grant is funding crews and materials to reroute and reconstruct the trail to allow better motorized accessibility. The grant also provides funding for crews to clear and maintain Off-Highway Vehicle trails in the district to continue to provide OHV access. The project is being completed by US Forest Service Staff, local motorized user groups, and contracted trail crews.

3. Upper Boardman Creek Trail Bridge Replacement

This recently funded project will replace a trail bridge crossing Boardman Creek in the Sawtooth National Forest. This bridge, recently closed due to its unsafe condition, is located at a popular access point for more than 150 miles of trails in the area. It is also 100 yards up the trail from a trail bridge constructed in 2014 using RTP funds that spans the South Fork of the Boise River. This project benefits single-track motorized trail users and will be completed by the US Forest Service in the summer of 2020. The Forest Service was awarded $28,500 in RTP grant funding, with a match of $7,500.
The Organizations submit that fully funding of RTP would trigger far larger amounts of matching and leveraging of funds from outside sources. Often partner and outside funding continues well beyond the matching capacity of RTP money, but the lack of RTP funding to focus these efforts around means this money may not be as fully utilized as it could be. The RTP is always a catalyst for efforts and the Organizations vigorously submit that a fully funded RTP program would create benefits on the ground from this increased leveraging of funding that would far exceed the value of the increase in RTP funding.

It is worth noting that the RTP provides funding for motorized and non-motorized trails alike and is administered by the states who select the projects to fund. By law, 30% of the funding goes to motorized trails, 30% goes to non-motorized trails, and 40% goes to mixed-use trails in the states. The Organizations are intimately aware that a loss of the RTP program funding would directly negatively impact our efforts but the Organizations do not rely exclusively on RTP monies to operate. The same cannot be said of other large groups of recreational users. Without RTP funding the non-motorized portions of the CPW Trails program simply would cease to function as there is no other source of funding available for these efforts.

B. Economic benefits and jobs from the RTP program are more important than ever with the challenges from COVID.

The Organizations are aware there is not the high level of controversy around the RTP program that there has been with the several stimulus bills that have been passed in response to COVID. RTP funds, leveraged with registration monies, provide direct funding which is important to the long-term economic recovery of the country from the COVID. In Colorado this funding hires more than 400 seasonal employees for shovel ready maintenance projects protecting natural resources, through federal, state and local agencies. The Organizations could not envision a more effective manner to provide economic stimulus than this, as these jobs are critically sought after in these times of unprecedented unemployment throughout the Country. Unprecedented unemployment has resulted in many positions receiving dozens of applicants, instead of being difficult to fill. This is a clear indication of the challenges Americans in Colorado are facing in providing basic resources. Failing to hire these 400 people would be in addition to the CPW staff salaries reflected in the cash fund balance and these staff would be the first employees within CPW to have experienced any job loss as part of the COVID response. Without these funds, these 400 plus people will not be hired. Again, these factors weigh in favor of allocating existing funds faster rather than rescinding funding.

These employees and related volunteer support for these programs results in almost 60 dedicated and well-equipped maintenance crews providing recreational access to public lands throughout the year. Last year these crews cut more than 12,000 dead trees off the trail network in the state. While this is an impressive number of trees cut, in many areas this is insufficient to maintain access due to the huge number of dead trees in many areas. More funding is critically needed to maintain recreational opportunities.

The economic contributions that result from this funding are exemplified by the fact that the $1.3 million in combined RTP funding and user registration monies from the snowmobile community allows for a vigorous winter backcountry recreational community in Colorado. In 2017, the Dept of Commerce estimated the economic contribution from this recreational activity to be more than $475 million dollars. The Organizations submit that with the challenges being faced in the post-COVID response, benefits such as this are more important than ever.

Thank you for your consideration. It is absolutely critical that HR 5797 be included in the upcoming transportation reauthorization bill.

 

Respectfully Submitted,

Scott Jones, Esq.
CSA Executive Director
IRC, TPA & COHVCO Authorized Representative

Trails Preservation Alliance logo COHVCO logo CSA logo Idaho Recreation Council logo

 

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UPDATE: ACTION ALERT $5 Million In Colorado OHV Funds At Stake

Action Alert Update

We wanted to provide an update on the OHV fund situation after a week of hearings with the Joint Budget Committee…

RIGHT NOW WE ARE CAUTIOUSLY OPTIMISTIC.

Here is why:

You were heard
Your comments were definitely heard by the JBC, so thanks to everyone that commented, we think they made a difference!

Issues are still on-going
Things are very unsettled in general in Denver and this issue is a long way from being completely resolved.

The OHV fund is a known resource
The OHV fund has come up with the JBC once and was declined to pursue. This could come back up as there is a large shortfall in the state budget.

If you’re not aware of the situation, please read the initial Action Alert. Be assured, we will continue monitoring the situation and keep you updated!

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A Call to Action for all Outdoorsmen Across America – AZ Backcountry Explorers

Article dated January 12, 2020 from the Arizona Backcountry Explorers website.

There is a lot of good information and recommendations – check out the entire article on their site.

 

Arizona Backcountry Explorers logoThe future of outdoor recreation lies in your hands

We are rapidly losing recreational opportunities across the west. I am not asking for your money. Nor am I asking you to attend any meetings or submit comments on a terrible land-use issue. We are reaching out to you to gain support and send a message to our Congressmen. It’s time to take this to Washington for a real solution.

Introduction

As you may know, we have been talking a lot about the recent changes in the Tonto National Forest. Chances are if you’re reading this, you’re probably concerned.

In this article, I will reach out to members of the outdoor community across the US. I will give you the solution to the land use issues we have been fighting for so many years. But first, I must tell you a little history about how we beat BLM. I will tell you how it works, what to do, and who supports this effort.

After reading this article, you will ask yourself, “why hasn’t my club or organization done this before?” It can only be one of two things, greed or ignorance. From this article, you will have the tools to bring our federal land managers to their knees and force them into compliance. You will be able to bring the power back to the state, in other words, the people. You will level the playing field for your club or organization.

Continue reading the article on their website: https://www.azbackcountryexplorers.com/2020/01/a-call-to-action-for-all-outdoorsmen.html

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2020 Colorado OHV Program Grant Awards Announced

2020 OHV Grant Award Program cover imageSince the OHV Program started in 1991, more than $62 million from OHV registration fees have been allocated for “on the ground” improvements for motorized recreation.

In 2020, $4,456,258 was allocated to motorized recreation projects across the state!

This PDF highlights the grants that were awarded for 2020. Work on these projects will begin in the summer of 2020. Look for the OHV Program’s acknowledgment of your “OHV Registration Dollars at Work” on your favorite trail.

Download the full PDF of grants awarded here:
Colorado Parks & Wildlife 2020 Off-Highway Vehicle Grant Awards

Thinking your club should get in on this?
We think so too!

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Colorado Trails Program Funding Rescission – Letter to the JBC

Colorado Trails Program Funding Rescission 

Sent via email to:
Senator Dominick Moreno
dominick.moreno.senate@state.co.us

Representative Daneya Esgar
Daneya.esgar.senate@state.co.us

Representative Julie McCluskie
Julie.mccluskie.house@state.co.us

Senator Bob Rankin
bob.rankin.senate@state.co.us

Representative Kim Ransom
kim.ransom.house@state.co.us

Senator Rachel Zenzinger
senatorrachelz@gmail.com

 

Dear Senators and Representatives:

The Trails Preservation Alliance (TPA) is providing this letter to express our vigorous opposition to any possible rescission of funds from the Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) Trails Program.  We understand the possibility of fund rescission is due to ongoing budget issues resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The TPA is a volunteer organization created to be a viable partner to public lands managers, working with the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to preserve the sport of trail riding and multi-use recreation.  The TPA acts as an advocate for recreational trail riding and takes the action to ensure that the USFS and BLM allocate a fair and equitable percentage of public lands access to diverse trail multi-use recreational opportunities.

The TPA must strongly object to rescission of funds that have been collected through the “voluntarily” created user fund specifically for the registration of Off-Highway Vehicles (OHV) and snowmobiles and are clearly not general tax revenues.

Governor Polis has repeatedly stated that the COVID-19 response is a statewide issue and that our collective response should be unified across all residents of the State. All Coloradans are equally responding to the COVID-19 challenge together and by asking one community (e.g., the OHV & Snowmobile users) to bear disproportionate costs of recovery, simply because funding from a voluntarily created user fund is available, directly contradicts the unified response that has been professed thus far.  As the Governor has repeatedly and consistently stated in his response efforts to the COVID-19 pandemic, this will only work when the state moves in a unified manner and any proposed rescission of CPW Trails Program funding is in direct contradiction to a unified response.

Records may indicate that funds are residing in the OHV cash fund, however, a large portion of this money has already been spent and is awaiting reimbursement or is allocated for operations of the program and overhead. Most trail projects are reimbursed only after work is completed and as a result, the many small nonprofit organizations that accomplish this work are unable to cover these costs outside of grant funding. Under federal contracting requirements, even federal agencies can only cover these costs for a short period of time, to allow for the processing of reimbursement paperwork.  This creates the appearance that there is more funding available than there actually is as reimbursement is often a very protracted process. Declining this contractually obligated reimbursement will destroy most grant applicants.  Failing to provide contractually obligated reimbursements will also put the Program in direct violation of federal, state or local contracting laws.  Even if money was returned later to the Program, these violations could not be corrected or remedied.

The TPA must also emphasize that the Trails Program funding is important to the long-term economic recovery in Colorado from the COVID-19 pandemic, as this funding hires more than 400 seasonal employees for trail maintenance projects protecting natural resources, through federal, state and local agencies.  The TPA can not envision a more effective manner to provide economic stimulus than this CPW grant program, as these jobs are likely to be critically sought after in these times of unprecedented unemployment throughout our State. Unprecedented unemployment has resulted in many positions receiving multiple applicants.  This is a clear indication of the challenges Coloradans are facing in providing basic resources for the sustainment of their well-being. Failing to hire these 400 people would be in addition to the CPW staff salaries reflected in the cash fund balance as these staff would be the first employees within CPW to have experienced any job loss as part of the COVID-19 response. Without these funds, these 400 plus people will not be hired.

This funding provides recreational opportunities for all Coloradans, a priority for protection in the Governor’s response to COVID-19, and provides protection for natural resources involved in recreation.  The Trail Program funds provides over 90% of the monies that maintain trails, provide signage, fund enforcement, and mitigate environmental impacts.  Federal budgets for recreational trails are nearly nonexistent.  Diverting those funds will only exacerbate the backlog, noting that non-motorized recreationists are beneficiaries of the CPW Recreational Trails Committee’s; OHV Grant Program considering that all “motorized trails” are open to non-motorized users. Education of all users to avoid impacts to natural resources from trail braiding when users attempt to social distance while recreating is critically time-sensitive. Avoiding impacts all together protects critical natural resources and costly restoration efforts at some point in the future.

The TPA strongly urges the JBC to reassess the possible rescission of funding as we believe the proper question must be “how do we get the money out to the clubs and agencies faster?” rather than” how much do we rescind?”.  While the Trails Program might appear a valid source of funds to respond to COVID-19, most of this money has already been encumbered to projects that align well with the recovery. Ensuring the economic recovery from the current pandemic and protecting recreational opportunities are both critical to our state’s response to the crisis.  If funding is rescinded, people who are currently employed will lose their employment because of this decision.

 

Sincerely,

D.E. Riggle
Director of Operations
Trails Preservation Alliance

 

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ACTION ALERT! $5 Million In Colorado OHV Funds At Stake

Action Alert

We need your help to protect the OHV funding program!

It has come to our attention that the Colorado Joint Budget Committee (JBC) is looking at rescinding all or part of the funding for the Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) program in response to the COVID outbreak. This is the fund that is created from your OHV dollars and it will be used for other purposes despite the fact it is not general tax revenues.

This would mean millions of your registration dollars would be lost!

While we are all concerned about the COVID issues and response, redirecting the OHV fund is not the way to solve this problem.

You can help by emailing the Colorado Joint Budget Committee members!

We need you to email the JBC members (politely) and let them know this is not acceptable. Here are some points that you can cut and paste – but we encourage you to rewrite or add personal experiences with the program.

Comment suggestions to use in opposition to the rescission:

  1. The OHV is a voluntarily collected fund for the benefits of the trails community and should not be reallocated for other uses as the program benefits all trail use, both motorized and nonmotorized; in fact, it outstrips all funding from other sources set aside for trails by a factor of 5! This is motorized money that is protected by Colorado law. This is not general tax revenues.
  2. The Governor has repeatedly stated the COVID response is a statewide issue and response should be unified across all residents of the State. It is unfair to place additional burdens or costs on certain user groups simply because there is money available – this rescission would do just that.
  3. The funding challenges are being encountered in the trails’ community at record levels, given the record visitation to the many dispersed recreational facilities after recreational activity was allowed in the Governor’s COVID orders. This money will be critical to maintaining these facilities in response to the record usages that have resulted from the Governor’s exceptions to the stay at home orders for recreation. It will create another year’s backlog for trail maintenance.
  4. The OHV program hires more than 400 seasonal employees for shovel ready maintenance projects protecting natural resources, through federal, state, and local agencies. These jobs are critical to the recovery and have already received dozens of applicants for each position as a result of the record levels of unemployment.
  5. OHV grants are contractual obligations and must be honored as most require the grantee to outlay money and then apply to be reimbursed from the grant. This reimbursement process can take time and as a result, much of the fund may have already been spent and simply awaiting reimbursement from the program. Failing to reimburse grantees is a “double lose” situation as money has already been spent and then could never be reimbursed.
  6. OHV grants are contractual obligations and governed by Federal, State, and Local procurement statutes and have taken decades of effort to align. Once a reimbursement does not happen these laws are violated and returning the money does not cure these violations in the short term
  7. JBC members should be asking is not “How do we redirect the OHV fund?” but rather “How do we get the OHV program funds on the ground faster?”

Email JBC members (politely) at the addresses below:

Senator Dominick Moreno – dominick.moreno.senate@state.co.us
Representative Daneya Esgar – Daneya.esgar.senate@state.co.us
Representative Julie McCluskie – Julie.mccluskie.house@state.co.us
Senator Bob Rankin – bob.rankin.senate@state.co.us
Representative Kim Ransom – kim.ransom.house@state.co.us
Senator Rachel Zenzinger – senatorrachelz@gmail.com

Easily copy all email addresses to place into your email here: dominick.moreno.senate@state.co.us, Daneya.esgar.senate@state.co.us, Julie.mccluskie.house@state.co.us, bob.rankin.senate@state.co.us, kim.ransom.house@state.co.us, senatorrachelz@gmail.com

 


CSA, TPA, COHVCO logos

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The TPA is excited to Introduce our New Legal Team!

The TPA Board of Directors has recently entered into an agreement with the Holsinger Law LLC to begin representing the TPA and provide legal support as needed.

Kent Holsinger

Kent Holsinger is the founder and managing partner of Holsinger Law, LLC.  Based in Denver, Colorado, the firm has four attorneys and two paralegals and specializes in natural resources issues including public lands, wildlife, and water law.  Other practice areas include estate planning, real estate, corporate, and litigation.  Kent’s efforts have been recognized in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and on National Public Radio among many others.

Kent comes from a ranching family in Colorado’s North Park.  Prior to starting the firm, he served as the Assistant Director for Water at the Colorado Department of Natural Resources and worked in Washington, D.C. for U.S. Senator Wayne Allard and Congressman Bob Schaffer.

He has received many honors including 5280’s Top Lawyers for Agricultural and Rural Law; Who’s Who in Energy; and Who’s Who in Agriculture.  Kent served as president of the Colorado Lawyers Chapter of the Federalist Society and as Vice-Chair to Colorado’s Conservation Easement Oversight Commission.  He is Secretary to the Board of Directors for Western Energy Alliance and a recent appointee to Colorado’s Aeronautical Board.  On June 1, 2019, Kent broke a world record (cert. pending) for fastest flight in the category between North America’s highest airport (Leadville, Colo.) and its lowest (Death Valley, Calif.).

Kent is admitted to practice in the State of Colorado; U.S. District Court for Colorado; the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals; and the U.S. Supreme Court.  Kent has represented clients in federal courts in Colorado, Wyoming, California, and Washington, D.C. as well as the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals and U.S. Supreme Court.  He has testified before Congress many times on topics including the Colorado River; settlement of Tribal reserved water rights; proposed improvements to the Endangered Species Act; and curtailing excessive and abusive environmental litigation.

Kent HolsingerAn avid motorcycle rider since age 5, Kent is passionate about enjoying the outdoors and preserving and improving access for multiple uses.  He currently rides a Kawasaki KLX 350 and a BMW GS1200. 

“It is an honor and pleasure to represent the Trails Preservation Alliance (TPA) in all of its important work and legal needs,” said Holsinger.  He is enjoying getting to know TPA members and affiliates and is carefully considering the Rico-West Dolores litigation.  Kent is committed to helping maintain public access to public lands for all types of recreation.  All forms of OHV recreation provide tremendous economic benefits to Colorado communities.

The TPA is certainly glad that he’s on board! Welcome, Kent!

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